Peer Review

What is it?

Why do it?

Response Tools

A practice session

Our first peer review assignment

More about peer review


What is it?

Peer review occurs when one person reads the writing of another and gives feedback. The review can be focused (looking at the writing for organization or for conventions only) or it can be general (looking at the writing for its overall strengths and weaknesses). Feedback can be verbal or written. Email is a great tool to use for peer review. When a student publishes his or her writing on the web, others can email him or her with their comments. A communication between the two, between reader and writer, can continue with email very easily.

 

Why do it?

One main problem writers face when beginning the revision process is that they have trouble gaining an objective perspective. It's hard to see our own writing as it really is. Instead, because we know how we want it to be, we tend to unconsciously make logical connections where there are none, we read sentences as complete or meaningful even if they confuse others, and we fill in the places where words or connections are missing.

So, when someone who does not know what our intentions were reads our writing, he or she can give an honest opinion. She may say, "This is a really interesting idea, but here, in your third paragraph, I don't know what you are trying to say. What is this part supposed to mean?" This advice can help writers improve the clarity and meaning of their writing.

Peer review is the first step in audience feedback. When we publish our work on the web, this feedback can come from anywhere. Publishing on the web also gives writers the motivation they need to make sure their writing makes sense.

 

Response Tools

From NCTE

Using Six Traits

 

A practice session

This project was created by two Teachers College student teachers: Tracy Higashi and Lee Spilberg. They created a great peer review project. Thanks to Ted Nellen for this link.

Our first peer review assignment

Follow these directions carefully. 

Which Rubric to use?
Use the narrative rubric
for the letter from a character or the novel summary.
Use the informative rubric for everything else.

Go Back

 

More about peer review

From Ted Nellen

 

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